Geta Brătescu Apparitions

Romanian Participation at the 57th
International Art Exhibition — La Biennale di Venezia

Visitors

Visiting hours:

May 13th – November 26th, 2017
Tuesday – Sunday: 10:00 – 18:00

Closed on Mondays (except May 15th, August 14th, September 4th, October 30th, and November 20th)

Venues

Romanian Pavillion, Giardini della Biennale
Sestiere Castello, 30122 Venezia, Italy

Access to the Romanian Pavilion in Giardini della Biennale is based on a valid ticket only, which can be purchased at the entrance to the Giardini and Arsenale. The standard price of a ticket is 25 euros. Detailed information on tickets and access here.


New Gallery of the Romanian Institute for Culture and Humanistic Research
Campo Santa Fosca, Palazzo Correr, Cannaregio 2214, 30121 Venice

Access to the New Gallery of the Romanian Institute for Culture and Humanistic Research in Venice is free.

Nearby vaporetto stations
Line 1 – Stop San Marcuola (Casino) or Ca’d’Oro
Line 2 – Stop San Marcuola (Casino)


Romanian Pavilion in Giardini della Biennale

Romania owns a National Pavilion in the Giardini since 1938, bought from the Italian state when the Venice Pavilion (built in 1932, architect Brenno Del Giudice) was enlarged. The interior was planned under the attention of Nicolae Iorga. It was initially designed as an art salon with three rooms (the main, tall show room being flanked by two smaller ones) and it stayed like that until 1962, when the walls were demolished, uniting the three rooms into one single salon. The initial architecture was recreated in 2015, albeit temporarily, by architect Attila Kim for Adrian Ghenie’s Darwin’s Room.

[History of the Romanian Participation at the Venice Biennale]


New Gallery of the Romanian Institute for Culture and Humanistic Research in Venice

The Romanian Institute for Culture and Humanistic Research was officially established on 2 April 1930 and was inaugurated by historian Nicolae Iorga as the Historical-Artistic Institute of Venice, familiarly called by the Venetians Casa Romena [The Romanian House].

After a decade of fruitful activity, Casa Romena loses its vitality and is almost abandoned between 1945 and 1989. Renovation works start in January 1989, and on 8 May 1992, Casa Romena is reopened as the New Gallery of the Romanian Institute for Culture and Humanistic Research.

The first exhibition held at the New Gallery of the Romanian Institute for Culture and Humanistic Research, in parallel with the Romanian Pavilion, takes place in 1999, and in 2011 it becomes a second constant space for Romanian representation at the Venice Biennale.